Tag Archives: humility

Accessibility

I’m at the Denver Seminary Library right now, my favorite place to work because they have secluded desks and aisles upon aisles of delicious books, including all of Calvin’s letters and many compilations of his other writings. At this very moment they’re pumping cinnamon roll smell from the coffee shop into every nook and cranny. But I must stay focused, as much as I’d like to take my English tea and a book and be done with writing for the day. Anyway, I just came across this quote from Calvin in Beza’s biography of him, that shows how accessible he was, to everyone.

He says, “M. de Farges boasts of having talked with princes and kings, whereas I refused to speak to him. Speaking for myself, I do not boast of having talked to great noblemen. I will simply say that every day I talk to all those who need to see me, even the youngest and the poorest.”

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My nephew and I. This little child is easy to love.

Take a moment to think what this means. Though the theology Calvin wrote about penetrated through centuries of heresy to establish most of the doctrines that the evangelical church holds to today, Calvin himself wasn’t so busy being visionary that he couldn’t talk to little people with little minds and little finances. Beza describes his great gentleness in bearing with the weaknesses and failings of others, and his remarkable affability in meeting the young on their own level.

To be able to explain great doctrines to both children and seminary students would be incredible, except that it is a characteristic that many great minds have had. C. S. Lewis was just as influential (perhaps more so) in his Narnia stories to the children as he was to the Oxford pupils he tutored, or to the adults who read Mere Christianity.  And Jesus rebuked his disciples for them turning children away from Him, saying “Let the little children come to Me.” Of such is the kingdom of heaven.

Are you convicted a little bit? Do you think more highly of your conversations than Calvin did? What would happen if we took a moment to talk with the “least of these,” to listen compassionately to the incessant woes of the widow, to explain what it means to get along with siblings to an eight-year-old, to “every day” talk to those who need to see you, “even the youngest and the poorest”? I don’t know what that would look like, but I think it would be good.

It’s interesting that his dying words included an admonition to the young, to beware of this very thing.

“Let the young retain a sense of modesty without wanting to press too far ahead, for youth always entails an element of boasting, which seeks to exalt oneself and look down on others.”

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