Satisfied, Satisfied, Christ Has Satisfied

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A new editing project has been fed my way, so it will be another week before I can really dig into more research on John Calvin’s marriage. This editing project is a workbook accompaniment to a video series on mentorship and success. The audience is Christian students who are ready to launch out into the world and are trying to choose a path. What I love about this project is the focus it has on seeking God first, because many of the more specific particulars of our future will be added to us once we have sought God. (“Seek first the kingdom of God, and all these things will be added unto you.”)

This also fits perfectly with a chapter I just read in C. S. Lewis’s book on the Psalms. I don’t have it here with me; I’m in the library and could probably find it here if I really wanted to, but let me try to sum it up from memory. Lewis speaks of a thirst for God as if we are a parched land that soaks up water because water is the one solution to all its other problems. He talks about the rambunctious, indecently raucous praise of God that the Psalmist indulges in. This is the God of feasting, noisemaking, dancing, party poppers, and uncontrollable laughter. This is the God we seek and desire, not as a stuffy, starched-collar ascetic, but as a child who just woke up on Christmas morning and saw that it had snowed and that his parents were downstairs all rosy and jolly and full of love.

And, to round up everything I’ve read still further under one blanket topic, I recently came across a video post by Steve DeWitt called, Dealing with Disappointment When You’re Single. His main point was that he had “done” all that could be done, as a righteous man, to prepare for marriage. He was a pastor, he had prayed for his wife since he was 18, he truly wanted to be content while at the same time wanting to be married. Many married people tried to encourage him, like Job’s friends tried to encourage Job– not really helpful, not very truthful– with all their solutions. Finally the reigning glory and the thought that overcame his loneliness was that God had provided Jesus Christ for his salvation, and with Him, has He not freely provided him all things? Rather than it being a promise that he would get married, Steve took it as a promise that God was ultimately the satisfaction of all desires. Whether He provided marriage or not, He would, and did, satisfy.

This was a blessing to me. It is not wrong to want marriage and to look for it, but in the cosmic order of things, Jesus Christ Himself has been provided for my satisfaction and happiness. Nothing else will give it.

And just so I wouldn’t forget the lesson, one more reminder was given to me—this time in a sermon by Barry Cooper on Ecclesiastes 2. Believe it or not, the topic was on the Search for Satisfaction, and verse by verse Barry listed every reason that Solomon had to be satisfied… and yet he wasn’t. “One of the things that spoils our pleasures is our hunger to get out of them more than they can give. They weren’t designed to bring ultimate satisfaction. They were designed to point to Someone who can. …The problem is that we are far too easily pleased.”

Solid joys and lasting pleasure,

None but Zion’s children know.

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